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Decisive battle in  Korea by azazel1944 Decisive battle in  Korea by azazel1944
A.D. 16th century, Japan invades Korea, China's Ming Dynastyaccepts Korea to invite, to send out the army to help Korea to resist Japanese the aggression, this picture was theperformance then war scene。And commemorates the Chinese servicemen which these has not seen thevictory
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:iconnwtc:
NWTC Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2014
This is brilliant! Reminds me of those old pictures depicting the Battle of Waterloo, especially colour wise.
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:iconmarcuscrassus:
MarcusCrassus Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2013
Gorgeous. And it illuminates a war not very well known in the west.  
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:iconseobumsu:
seobumsu Featured By Owner Jul 13, 2013
i'm korean, so i see like this planty, but this is cool!!!
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:iconneotokyo6:
Neotokyo6 Featured By Owner Apr 2, 2013
ironic few year later korea have been invade by very same army that come to aid them.

(by manchu dynasty BTW which overthrow ming not long after war with japan)
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:iconxhagast:
xhagast Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2013
I have heard of this. Toyotomi Hideyoshi's blunder. He wanted to conquer China and Korean and Chinese troops beat the crap out of him. Typical Japanese arrogance to think he could just go and become emperor of China.
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:iconprinzluzifer:
PrinzLuzifer Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2011
Is that Katou Kiyomasa?He looks in trouble…很喜欢你的《阎浮提行记》和《悼武》
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:iconsiwawuth:
siwawuth Featured By Owner Aug 22, 2011
this pic is powerful
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:iconsinosphere:
sinosphere Featured By Owner Jun 21, 2011
To Crabtasterman
My point isn't that Korea should just take it or suggesting they were too feeble, it was that in the context of war, undesirable things are bound to arise even from one's own allies, or even from one's own forces. You do know Koreans also looted and stole from each other during the war, as well as rape. Yet, by your logic we should denounce all of Korea for the actions of a few assholes. That is my entire point: In war atrocities will happen from both sides, but to denigrate the total contributions of people who were sent to defend land that wasn't even their own is low imo. This really has nothing to do with Sun Yat Sen or qing revolutionary thought. The arguments you gave for that is abstract from the context, even random. But after what you said : "Let me make myself clear. It's been quite a while since the first post and I've seen new things and buried the old. The Ming did fight well, but in general they had a bad image and there are quite some people that thought they didn't fight all that well because of several reasons." I have a little better understanding on your position and I'm willing to try to discuss this rationally with you in the hopes that you aren't the complete shitbag that I thought you were trying to be.

Equating this with the Nanjing massacre is also a poor comparison. The goal of the Japanese were to kill and torture as much civilians as they can, and were given these orders from their chain of command. No Ming officer ordered their soldiers to rape or kill Korean civilians. As I've said, I'm not naive to think that no atrocities occurred, but rather it was from the few despicable soldiers in the ranks, not the entire army. You say it was a stupid idea to resupply from Korean lands, and that the Ming resupply was basically pillaging. You should understand the logistics available during that time period, and military maneuvers contemporary of that time. Armies back then would be mainly resupplied from the allied lands, rather than be mainly supplied from their own home base. Also you should realize that the joseon court gave permission for allied troops to resupply from Korean lands, and were responsible for allocation of supplies to the coalition army. Either supply was not abundant during the war because of a difficult mountaneous overland route into Korea, and because of an already war scarred Korean landscape. The Chinese official Song Yingchang and general Qian Shizheng would write about the tremendous difficulties of resupplying the allied forces in their records, the failure of the korean court and adjutancy in managing supplies, and that in some cases, Chinese armies had to take grain and rice from village reserves. It is unfortunate and caused further suffering to the people, but there absolutely was no other choice. This is in no way shape or form similar to the nanjing massacre at all.

Like I said previously, I am not shitting on Admiral Yi's achievements. He performed miracles during the war, but it is overly gross exaggeration to literally say that it was him alone that won the war. You give me examples of that finnish sniper getting 600+ kills against russians, but did the outcome of that finnish-russo war turn out the way it did just because of him? No he played only a part of an effort that was undertaken by a whole nation. Admiral Yi did wonders against the Japanese navy, and wrecked havoc on Japanese supplies. But he did not have the manpower or land assets to dislodge or push back the Japanese occupation. His actions slowed the Japanese land advance, but could not defeat it just by himself and at sea. Chinese and Korean forces on land had to also achieve victories and push back the Japanese forces in order to gain any kind of meaningful outcome. It was the retaking of Pyongyang and Kaesong, and the land sieges of 3 other cities that put the Japanese land commanders into a desperate situation and convince hideyoshi that a ceasefire was the best option. I agree with you that Korea should have been consulted during the ceasefire talks, but it wasn't a deliberate slight at Korea. It was Japan that came only to negotiate with China, and since Ming China was involved in 2 other wars at the western frontiers at the time, Emperor Wanli wanted a fast resolution to the Korean conflict so he could focus his resources back to the west. The diplomats handling the negotation terms both had misunderstandings and interests to prolonge the ceasefire long as possible, this is why you have different correspondences between the envoys to their leaders. The bit about Chen Wei Jing is misleading as it was just a defection story blown out of proportion by Japanese nationalist historians during the 19th century to make themselves feel good. The actual truth (from the historical archives and peer reviewed analysis between the top international east asian historians) is that Song Yingchang and Li Rusong did not open negotians with the japanese, The Japanese came to them offering ceasefire on the table, since the Japanese command had vastly underestimated the scale of a war on mainland asia, and the actual effective military power of China, along with a surprisingly stubborn Korean resistance. All the Japanese generals (except Kato Kiyomasa, he was a bit of a war addict) wanted to end the war, and tried to get the best deal to end. This is where you get the proposition to divide Korea on the war lines that existed in 1593. This was far from their initial goal of actually trying to conquer China through Korea. Since Hideyoshi had a different version of what was happening with his war effort, he thought he had more negotiating terms than he did, so he made demands that were out of his scope. Like demanding provinces and princesses. Unreasonable demands that were rejected resuming the war again. You are correct that Ming China could have destroyed the Japanese invasion forces in short time if Emperor Wanli actually concentrated his war effort in Korea, but like I said, he wanted to deal with 2 larger wars in the west.

Some Ming generals were just glory hogs that wanted recognition and medals? True, but wouldn't you say this is true of every army? It is unavoidable that greed and wanting the fastest and easiest way to promotion exists. But there are also honest generals and soldiers. I wonder why you choose to only look at one side of the whole picture, and pin the nature of human greed on Chinese people alone, if the reason isn't just for biased slander. Speaking of honest generals, Chen Lin and Admiral Yi were close friends and had mutual respect for each other. It was Chen Lin who advocated to the Ming administration that Admiral Yi should be in charge of the allied naval force and not him. The intial plan agreed upon by Chinese and Korean leadership was Li Rusong as supreme commander of land forces, Chen Lin as supreme commander of Naval forces, and Song Yingchang as chief administrator of the entire coalition. Kind of like the command arrangement in Desert Storm. (with the americans in charge of the coalition with norman schwarzkopf. Chen Lin relinquished the post for Yi Sun Shin, and when Yi died it was noted in the records that Chen cried for him in the middle of the Noryang battle. I don't see an actual valid reason for you to bag on him. I dunno where you got the idea that Yi Sun Shin took a bullet going to save Chen Lin... When actually its stated he took a stray bullet while pursuing the RETREATING japanese force...

Liu Ting made a tactical error at Suncheon, maybe it was communication error or just a straight up blunder, but to call his actions treacherous is really absurd. He is one of the key figures that that helped Korea build their defenses, and rebuild their army by training their troops during the ceasefire.

And you are still wrong with Nuzhen since Yue Fei was not defeated by them...after all, his victories against the Nuzhen/Jurchens is thats what he's famous for. Him and his army fought to the outskirts of Kaifeng and was poised to retake the former capital. What defeated him in the end was the same thing that almost got Admiral Yi... his own countrymen in the form of corrupt court officials. Admiral Yi was lucky as he was released from prison, General Yue Fei wasn't as he was executed by Qin Hui. He is very similar to Admiral Yi Sun Shin, and is just as important culturally and historically to Chinese people as Yi Sun Shin is to Korea. As you know I've treated your Admiral Yi with great respect and cared enough to actually research unbiased historical fact about him over the years. If we're gonna talk about this the least you could do is refrain from speaking falsely about him, or at least have the respect to actually read up about him beforehand. Defeat by Xianbei? seriously now... you can't even make an honest mistake about something like that unless you seriously have no idea what you were talking about.
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:iconrivendusk:
RivenDusk Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2010  Professional Digital Artist
The colors and tone remind me of a Durer piece. Very nicely executed.
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:iconfleacharyucko:
fleacharyucko Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2010  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Amazing! Shows your mastery and versatility!
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:iconxlordandyx:
XLordAndyX Featured By Owner Jun 13, 2010  Student General Artist
WoooooW!!!! AMAZING WORK!!!
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:iconallenhwong:
AllenHwong Featured By Owner Dec 20, 2009
so cool,i know this history```
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:iconmshindo9:
Mshindo9 Featured By Owner Dec 10, 2009
Hwarang, Korea's Warrior Knights. Are these the men on depicted on the horses?
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:iconfong-saiyuk:
fong-saiyuk Featured By Owner Jun 25, 2012
nope, the cavalry flags say "ming"

also, the hwarang were around during the silla dynasty (10-11 century), but didn't exist during the joseon era i don't think
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:iconku218:
ku218 Featured By Owner Dec 7, 2009
Wait something's weird? Ming Dynasty, the Korean Army troops might have
In fact, the right and others do not fight the battle of Battle of Noryang the Walled City of Pyongyang
I have a fight. (Ming Dynasty fought only eight times out there I do not count.
In fact, 68 times the Chosen Army during the Japanese army and fought a fierce battle that came 65 times
While I was winning that war, the stars and one trillion days
The winner is none other than the Chosen Army.
Although the Korean royal ancestral 14 due to silly tricks to change the winner in the Ming Dynasty
Discard improbable recording doeeotgin leave but ... ㄱ - South Korea whose very jeorosseon
Jjokpalyineyo ......
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:iconcrabtasterman:
CrabTasterMan Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2009
The "army" sent by China did nothing. They were mainly there for settling diplomatic issues. On some occasions they even took credit for battles they didn't win, Koreans just let them have the "heads of fallen Japanese soldiers" as "proof" of battle service. Diplomatically, the Chinese, secretly, without telling the Koreans, had talks with Japan about making China stay out of this war for a promise not to invade China later(fat chance, the Japs planned to do that all along), but Hideyoshi's arrogance demanding the "ambassador army" one of the Chinese emperor's daughters to marry "for bettering relations", was considered too arrogant, so no success there. No Chinese army won a "decisive battle" in the Imjin War. The army sent was too little, did nothing, and even leeched off of the Korean government to provide for some of their supplies. Only several years into the war did the Chinese emperor send enough troops to be called an real army, but still not enough. Since when did China ever care about Korea other than those many failed attempts to eat it up? Looking at history, would these arrogant Chinese ever think it worthwhile to give it their all to aid a nation they never cared for?

From start to finish the war was won by the Korean Admiral Yi-Sunsin at sea, cutting enemy supplies; a starving enemy army cannot fight. That and militias, but those came later. The Chinese army had nothing to do with it. If one reads into the small details in this war it's evident that the Chinese had little if any effect on the actual war. Don't attempt to give them credit when they deserve none. If Chinese soldier's should be credited with anything, it's for other wars in their history. Not this "neighbor's war."
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:iconfong-saiyuk:
fong-saiyuk Featured By Owner Jun 28, 2012
I don't know what history you've been reading, but the Ming presence in Korea during the Imjin wars was a large factor in defeating the Japanese. Most scholarly sources, including Japanese and Korean primary sources, state that the Ming won several decisive battles during the war. One of these was the siege of Pyongyang, which halted the Japanese advance north. I don't want to diminish Choseon's role in the war, but you have to account for the fact that the Ming did contribute a great deal as well.
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:iconaacbushido:
AACBushido Featured By Owner Aug 27, 2009
I must say it is very beautiful, very well done
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:iconyongi-ru:
yongi-ru Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2009
This is fantasticcc o Ao

briliant detail and composition * u*
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:iconodiumediae:
odiumediae Featured By Owner Dec 30, 2008  Student Writer
Wow, this is as detailed and well balanced as an 17th century oil painting. You are extremely talented! Amazing!
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:iconchicomoose:
chicomoose Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2008
I just looked at your entire gallery. I am going to have to make comments on some of the others I've seen also. But first your's. WOW! You are great! I am not an artist, though my son is. I am definitely an art appreciator. And boy do I appreciate your art. Please keep it up, you are amazing and one of the best I've seen on here.
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:iconfrostmourne16:
frostmourne16 Featured By Owner Apr 13, 2008  Student Traditional Artist
Astounding attention to detail! Great work!!! :star::star::star::star::star:
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:iconastrophia:
Astrophia Featured By Owner Apr 12, 2008
Wow^^ What an amazing picture^^
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:iconxenozthetroll:
xenozthetroll Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2008
Very nice.
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:iconsix2end:
six2end Featured By Owner Mar 14, 2008  Hobbyist General Artist
Beautifull !!!
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:iconmarvisionart:
marvisionart Featured By Owner Mar 8, 2008  Professional General Artist
Geez, this is awesome. That's one I must do at least. An epic battle scene.

Great work!
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:iconhybridrain:
HybridRain Featured By Owner Feb 29, 2008  Professional Filmographer
war!!!!!!!!!
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:iconseedleash:
seedleash Featured By Owner Feb 20, 2008  Professional
stunning work!
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:iconeyesmith:
Eyesmith Featured By Owner Feb 10, 2008
Truly Masterpiece !!

I'll practice more to be like you !!
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:icononikaizer:
Onikaizer Featured By Owner Jan 27, 2008  Professional Digital Artist
awesome composition, a classic piece.
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:iconsyarul:
syarul Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2008  Hobbyist Digital Artist
oh :omg: this full of historical impact, I love the fact that the greatest China dynasty was Ming after all. along with the building of Great Wall their accomplishment was in fact something to be proud of. It also well known to the south east empires around that time too
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:iconcrabtasterman:
CrabTasterMan Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2009
The "army" sent by China did nothing. They were mainly there for settling diplomatic issues. On some occasions they even took credit for battles they didn't win, Koreans just let them have the "heads of fallen Japanese soldiers" as "proof" of battle service. Diplomatically, the Chinese, secretly, without telling the Koreans, had talks with Japan about making China stay out of this war for a promise not to invade China later(fat chance, the Japs planned to do that all along), but Hideyoshi's arrogance demanding the "ambassador army" one of the Chinese emperor's daughters to marry "for bettering relations", was considered too arrogant, so no success there. No Chinese army won a "decisive battle" in the Imjin War. The army sent was too little, did nothing, and even leeched off of the Korean government to provide for some of their supplies. Only several years into the war did the Chinese emperor send enough troops to be called an real army, but still not enough. Since when did China ever care about Korea other than those many failed attempts to eat it up? Looking at history, would these arrogant Chinese ever think it worthwhile to give it their all to aid a nation they never cared for?

From start to finish the war was won by the Korean Admiral Yi-Sunsin at sea, cutting enemy supplies; a starving enemy army cannot fight. That and militias, but those came later. The Chinese army had nothing to do with it. If one reads into the small details in this war it's evident that the Chinese had little if any effect on the actual war. Don't attempt to give them credit when they deserve none. If Chinese soldier's should be credited with anything, it's for other wars in their history. Not this "neighbor's war."
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:iconsyarul:
syarul Featured By Owner Nov 11, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
ugh history lesson :sleep: In the best effect, we could prattle all day long about how good or bad was a race. But a story is a story, ended when it should have end, it lives in people who see it as a lesson for good reason or bad. If it anger, distrust and hatred why would we walk on the same surface and sheltered from the same sun? Spilling blood for a reason that the world is not enough to share a foot or two. When we are goner probably we envy more than what we have done in live.
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:iconcrabtasterman:
CrabTasterMan Featured By Owner Nov 13, 2009
You know you are missing the point here. I am very against the misrepresentation of history in China and Japan. SURE, all you MOOKS say "oh so what, every country does propaganda." And those are your answers for everything. "Chinese products are notoriously crappy." "Oh sure, all countries produce crappy products here and there." Yeah, but the problem is HOW MUCH. There is a reason even Jackie Chan, a Chinese patriot himself, said "What? I never use Chinese appliances! They'll EXPLODE!" in a recent Intl. Special Olympics speaking session in Taiwan.

The issue in question is false telling, it's not even propaganda, it goes way beyond that. China and Japan, their level of warping history is akin to people saying "the Holocaust never happened." Have you heard of the Nanking Massacre? 300,000 gone within a short time period. Butchered for sport. Babies thrown up in the air in a game of catching with bayonets. Despite numerous foreigner eye-witnesses, the Japanese deny every having done that. One thing the Chinese will tell you is that Japanese army=army of rapists. "Oh sure, it's not unheard of victorious armies to go in and rape fallen peoples in conquered territory" yeah, but did any other army FIELD armies of kidnapped women for sex? It is a grave mistake to dismiss the reluctance of people to admit their atrocities, for it means they can get away with it. Do not dismiss history with your petty modernist "Oh the past doesn't matter, all we should ever care about are i-pods, global warming. and democracy, and spread more looooooooove, but we ain't hippies cuz we don't dress like them."

It's practical of people today with their American China-humping attitudes. It has always been the role of weeaboos ever since 1970s to go around "I love Japan and I love learning about their culture and I wanna go there someday, and I love saying 'bakabakabaka' cuz that's the only word I know and I have no idea that if I said it like that in Japan I'd be seen as a clowny retard, but it makes me feel special in my own society so I'll keep doing it." because that makes them feel like they are more sage and possess a "global mind" over rednecks who dunno their own geography, and lately, to further make themselves superior, they started to target another culture to distance themselves from those fools that only know Japan. These "prospectors" made Avatar and JackBlackPanda. Ever since 2008 Olympics the situation has become worse. The truly well-read and well-aware know China and Japan ain't all that cracked up as the media likes to portray them, and know that their propagandas should be carefully avoided and the truth must be told, lest the heinous forget their own crimes and be ever more bold and become future Hitlers.
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:iconsyarul:
syarul Featured By Owner Nov 22, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I think you should stop with your putrid racial hatred. I don't know how you've grown up to have a long-cut for scorching humanity as if everyone else does not deserve to live either r.i.p or yet lives. I do know one thing that some people lived to a bad or good reputation by their act. For example Hitler, regardless what he has done he leave something in his WAKE, so you might taken him as an example in your view. Simply saying things out of hand and how bad is a piece of A4 paper made in China might doom you to oblivion isn't going to change anything, ANYTHING. Probably in your death your heir even might use them to write death approval status on it to inherit any of your belongings. If you so hateful and determine to put change on the world today why not start with you the basis principal and act.
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:iconcrabtasterman:
CrabTasterMan Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2009
Who are you anyway, 90% of what you said has nothing to do with what I said earlier. I was merely pointing out a hated truth.

You presume too much, jumping the gun all the time. I don't have pure racial hatred. Besides, I never said anything about not letting anyone live. I think it'd be wonderfully convenient and harmonious if suddenly one day everyone could trust each other and be united between nations. But that ain't happening yet.

Hitler is not my idea of a role model. Lotsa bad decisions. Never saw the bigger picture above the bigger picture. He seemed to have simple racial hatred above practicality.

A4 paper? HA! Do you think it would behoove ANYONE to think that they are writing on paper made in China? Much less a China hater. Such trivial products isn't what's the issue here. (And I doubt they make quality paper in China... I was thinking more of the Americas. China can't spare anymore trees with all those construction works going on anyway)

Now we were talking about how this artist made a faux pas in his description, in the light of true history. You just don't get it, do you? How would you like when neighbors barged into your house to "help fight burglars" but all they did was plot behind your back and made deals with the burglars to kick you out of your home and split the spoils?
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:iconsyarul:
syarul Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2009  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Might be, but things always happen for a reason, like how earth circling sun in its own orbit. Same as well with me, I do not choose to live or yearn for it, but I'm here for a reason. It always circling in my head of what should I do. My heritage, my emotional barrier or what ever life's grand affections does not equate with the reason. And there's always a zion here on earth some place, should I wish myself there, I need a hovercraft with trusted crew. And we all have the same reason. always
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:iconcrabtasterman:
CrabTasterMan Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2009
What are you talking about? What's your "things always happen for a reason" talk gotta do with what I said earlier? "We all have the same reason?" Sorry to break your "I'm a unrecognized philosophical bigwig" moment, but you'd find quite a lot of people that have nothing in common with your "reason."

You, personally speaking, are simply laughable. I DID make the previous discussions restrained but now you just jumped into the realm of "impertinent topics that you think you can use to try to make yourself appear esoteric." You've just seated yourself up to the Fool's stage, let's see how much decay-ridden tomatoes I can pelt you with.

And things never happen for a "reason," not the way you explained it. Things happen, and in case of people, people just have to live with it. Sure there is a reason why Earth revolves around the sun, and there is a reason why we have life "as we define it" on this planet, but these things happened because things just happened to allow this, and it all seems extremely coincidental because we are seeing things in restrospect and also trying to derive some meaning from nothing significant, because if someone, like YOU, makes a "finding" in things in life, it just makes them smug, their arrogance even larger than before. There's no grandiose plan destined for anyone, neither religiously or ego-wise.

"My heritage, my emotional barrier or what ever life's grand affections does not equate with the reason." You are saying this like none of these things should affect anybody's life's "reasons."

I think, with your "And we all have the same reason. always," you seem to be centered around what you think and has never occurred to you that people think differently and can possibly be far more correct than you are, and in this case, SIMPLY BECAUSE YOU KNOW NEXT TO NOTHING ABOUT the historical background of this deviation.

"It always cirling my head of what should I do." I think you should keep thoughts circling in your head, thoughts about getting a proper education, seeing the world. Thoughts other than being an emo wannabe poet/wannabe philosopher.

"And there's always a zion here on earth some place, should I wish myself there, I need a hovercraft with trusted crew." You making a The Matrix reference? Well the only "TRUSTED" crew you will find, I tell you now, is whomever you THINK is viable for you "crew," and in your case, it's so obvious these people will consist of people that can gather around you drool over the putrid shit that falls out of your gastricular orifice you call "mouth." But such fools will be so hard to find, because of two very ironic reasons: 1) There just is a bottom limit to how dense people can be, and I'm afraid you aren't far from it than Chris Crocker can ever be from his incestuous homosexual brother 2) the fools around your stratum will be at least as full of themselves than you are, exhaling trash cheaper than a hooker's make-up and adding in references from, oh what do you know, some main media movie or comic because they never read anything or watched anything of academically educational value beyond the level found in Hannah Montana. And they are so proud of it. They think they sound so dreamy.

As a final note I want to say for today, not just to you, but anyone who might stumbleupon this:
Chinese history taught in mainland China is beriddled with so much false crap and propaganda, not even fellow Taiwanese people acknowledge it. This "DECISIVE BATTLE IN KOREA" is one of these cases. IT IS FOLLY, that these bandits who came to sell their neighbor for their own safety, are praised and depicted as doing ANYTHING beyond stealing kills (counted in collected heads) and demanding the Korean government to give them rations and supplies (we were on the verge of annihilation, dammit, what food do we have to spare? It's just a good thing our admiral Yi basically cutoff Japan's naval supply/retreat routes).
In my opinion, Chinese armies throughout history have never been very good despite being geared up pretty well (all thanks to bad leadership; just look at how many times they got their asses handed to them by the foreigners they call "barbarians"--which included Mongols, Manchus, Huns, XianBei, Turks--NOMADS! Plus all Europeans and Americans were considered freakish paleskinned barbarians whenever they were visited by them), but I would at least say "If one is looking for glorious Chinese military victories--I mean feats, then look elsewhere, like the patriotic Yue Fei who fought to defend the Song Dynasty to the last (but lost to XianBei in the end) or the stuff found in what foreigners might recognize as "Romance of the 3 Kingdoms" but that is a novelized historical fiction by Luo Guan Zhong, where some battles and feats were purely fictional--look for the true original text which the novel was modified from."
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(3 Replies)
:icongixajin:
Gixajin Featured By Owner Jan 20, 2008
Masterpiece of Epic proportions!
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:iconcarlos2013:
Carlos2013 Featured By Owner Jan 3, 2008   Digital Artist
This painting is beautiful!
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:iconkageshinnosuke:
KageShinnosuke Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2007
...Just Amazing....
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:iconmartinsilvertant:
MartinSilvertant Featured By Owner Nov 24, 2007  Professional General Artist
Very dynamic and detailed. Great colors aswell.
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:iconwaningmoons:
waningmoons Featured By Owner Nov 11, 2007
To Wraithblade 6:
Hate to be a knitpicker....but this is a pick of the Chinese coming to Korea's defense. Not a picture of Korea defending itself. =/

To Devilsaiyn:
In a one-to-one fight, a samurai probably would win. However, this is two armies, which at the time included regular soldiers. Often there is a misconception as to what Samurai are. They are like specialists. Most definitely there were not enough Samurai in feudal Japan to compose an army, at least not in the size and numbers of the Chinese army.
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:iconcrabtasterman:
CrabTasterMan Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2009
"but this is a pick of the Chinese coming to Korea's defense. Not a picture of Korea defending itself. =/" But in reality the Chinese soldiers sent there didn't do anything much, really. Too little. And they were there to conduct secret talks with Japan on the lines of "We know Hideyoshi is going to attack us after Korea falls. Can we do anything for you to ensure OUR SAFETY? We'll throw in a good word for Hideyoshi to our emperor, so he will reward the DIVINE MEGAAWESOME GIFT of the title 'Official Supreme Ruler of Japan'" (Yeah the Chinese think they own the world, when a foreign power comes to power in their OWN country, they think it a divine gift 'bestowing' them special titles and 'official positions' when none was asked. Did the same with the Western ambassadors when they came to China. "KNEEL BEFORE ME! I hereby name thee the official representative of Eeng-Guh-Lan")
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:iconfishbait6:
Fishbait6 Featured By Owner Oct 7, 2009
And what makes you think a samurai would win in a 1on1 fight? Please don't make ridiculous claims on these kinds of stuff with only super biased weeaboo sources as evidence D:
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:iconinfernalfinn:
InfernalFinn Featured By Owner Nov 8, 2007
incredible composition! I love the chaos of battle scenes. Beautifully done.
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:iconkwonpacalypse:
Kwonpacalypse Featured By Owner Oct 30, 2007
awesome hwarangs till the end!
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:iconcrabtasterman:
CrabTasterMan Featured By Owner Nov 10, 2009
This is Joseon... no Hwarangs here. and this pic has no Koreans, its Chinese soldiers supposedly owning the Japanese army. Stuff like this happened too few to mention, and when it did, most always with the accompany of a significantly large Korean army fighting alongside them. The Chinese were originally in Korea to conduct secret meetings with Japanese armies, buying a way to ensure the Japs don't attack China next.
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:iconashina21:
Ashina21 Featured By Owner May 14, 2010
You claim a lot to the contrary. Why don't you provide some evidence to back up your claims?
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:iconcrabtasterman:
CrabTasterMan Featured By Owner Jul 10, 2010
One example alone can show how undedicated they were in the war.
Just look at Ming General Liu Ting 劉綎 in the Battle of the Suncheon Japanese Fortress (순천왜성전투/順川倭城戰) in 1599 September ~ November. This battle is said to be last significant land battle in the war. In the fortress was 小西 行長 (Konishi Yukinaga), One of the three topmost Japanese generals spearheading the Invasion of Chosun (Joseon, 朝鮮 the dynastic nation of Korea at the time), was able to escape. You know why? Because General Liu was simply bribed by Yukinaga. Not only that, the attack on that fortress failed because the Chinese Ming, under Liu, did not even attack when the attack signals were made. The Koreans did, and the premade plan involving a cooperation of the two forces failed with much Korean casualties and no Chinese casualties. Liu didn't attack when that was the plan. You know how cowardly and material-minded that is? Right when they were about to get the topmost ranking general, Liu lets them escape. He sent out soldiers on standby but did not tell them to attack.

In case anyone makes an ad hominem attack saying can't trust what a Korean says because he/she maybe defending the pride of his/her nation: This is verified by a foreign historian, Kitajima Manji, ex-professor of Japan (Women's Municipal) University (日本公立女子大學), as stated in 역사스페셜 ("History Special") in 2010, July 3rd, in KBS national broadcast channel.
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